STEMtistics

CTEq provides research and information to help you make the case for STEM learning and literacy. 

Check out CTEq’s STEMtistics on a variety of topics (from girls in STEM to jobs and the workforce to minorities in engineering, and more!) for research and data to guide the STEM conversation.

Small Share

African Americans earn a small share of engineering bachelor's or higher degrees. By 2022, nine in ten new engineering jobs will require at least a bachelor's degree.

Sources: Change the Equation analysis of U.S. Department of Education data, 2014; Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013

 

Tags: minorities, engineering, Vital Signs, STEM degrees, higher education

Losing Ground

African Americans have lost ground in engineering degrees. While they comprise 14.2 percent of the college-aged population, African Americans are only awarded 4.3 percent of bachelor's degrees or higher. By 2022, nine in ten new engineering jobs will require at least a bachelor's degree.

Sources: Change the Equation analysis of U.S. Department of Education data, 2014; Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013

 

Tags: minorities, engineering, STEM degrees, higher education, Vital Signs

Opportunity Lost

35 percent of African American students attend high schools that did not offer calculus in 2010. 20 percent attend high schools that did not offer physics in 2010.

Source: Change the Equation analysis of U.S. Department of Education Data, 2012.

 

Tags: math, science, minorities, K-12, Vital Signs

Girls in the Classroom

23 percent of high school girls say they are interested in pursing computer science. However, less than half a percent of female college freshmen list STEM as their intended college major.

Sources: Girl Scouts Research Institute, 2012; National Science Foundation, 2012

Tags: women & girls, K-12, computer science, higher education, Vital Signs

STEM enthusiasm in the toilet

Thirty percent of Americans say they would rather clean the bathroom than solve a math problem. That finding could reflect the fact that many Americans experience math as a series of abstract or artificial "problems" disconnected from real-world problems that have a profound bearing on their lives. Math is critical to the future of the nation and everyone in it. We have to address the enthusiasm gap.

Tags: math

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