Blogs

High School STEM Literacy: Necessary, Yet Insufficient

December 19, 2016

This past election season invoked talk of putting people back to work—particularly in the manufacturing sector.  To help frame the scope of the problem, a study from the Brookings Institute claims that factories eliminated 6.7 million people’s positions with some industries completely dying out from 1980 to 2014. At first glance, that looks bad for manufacturing.

Tags: jobs & workforce

New data: Computer science for fun and profit

December 8, 2016

As we observe Computer Science Education Week, it’s worth celebrating some of the important ways in which computer science can enrich people’s lives. At Change the Equation, we often point to high salaries and low unemployment. Important as those advantages are, we should not forget another: computer science work is fun and satisfying.

Tags: computer science

PISA Shows Some Strides in Equity

December 6, 2016

The 2015 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) results don’t likely include much you haven’t heard before regarding U.S. students. We are falling behind many developed nations in math—23 points lower than the average of all the nations—and just staying afloat with average scores in science and reading.

Tags: math, science, education

And the Winner Is...Tennessine

December 1, 2016

November 28th marked a historical occasion for four new elements of the periodic table. After five months of waiting, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) revealed the approved names of its newest chemical family members. Say hello to nihonium (Nh), moscovium (Mc), tennessine (Ts), and oganesson (Og).

New data: Are Women Making Gains in Computing and Engineering?

November 22, 2016

In the past three weeks, we have been examining recent data on computing and engineering degrees.

Tags: women & girls, computer science, engineering

The Real Heroes of Modern Medicine

November 14, 2016

Google Doodle Covers Sir Frederick Grant BantingSay Happy Birthday to Sir Frederick Grant Banting, a Canadian scientist who became the youngest Nobel Prize laureate in Physiology or Medicine and the subject of today’s Google Doodle.

New Data: Minorities Gain Some Ground in Computer Science and Engineering Degrees

November 9, 2016

On October 26, we shared some good news about degrees in computer science and engineering: Since the recession, they grew much faster than degrees and certificates overall. Today, we take a closer look at students of color in those fields, and we have at least some good news to share--mixed with much that should concern us.

Tags: computer science, engineering, minorities

Quantitative Literacy for All

November 4, 2016

In 1816, Timothy Pitkin, U.S.

Superhero STEMspiration

November 2, 2016

This Marvel Variant cover represents ScienceSome of the best known (and coolest!) scientists, mathematicians, and engineers come from the big screen. And whether you realize it or not, these fictional characters shape ideas about who should pursue STEM and who shouldn't.

Tags: women & girls, minorities

New data: Inequities in K-12 science

October 27, 2016

This morning, The Nation's Report Card released good news. Since 2009, the nation's science scores rose in both fourth and eighth grades. Even more encouraging, black and Latino students gained on their peers, narrowing some of the gaps in student performance that have bedeviled education reformers for decades. Yet poor and minority students continue to lag far behind.

Tags: science, minorities

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