claus's blog

Top 5 U.S. Cities for Young Computer Professionals

October 16, 2014

You might think computer science is a young person's game dominated by whiz kids in hoodies. Think again. Nationally, a mere six percent of the computing workforce is younger than 25, compared to 13 percent of the workforce as a whole. What's more, the computing workforce is aging. This year, 43 percent is 45 or older, up from 35 percent in 2001.

Tags: Top 5, jobs & workforce, computer science

Top 5 U.S. Cities for Advanced Manufacturing

October 9, 2014

For at least 20 years, many Americans all but wrote off manufacturing as of factory jobs simply evaporated or went overseas. It's time to think again. Advanced manufacturing has come roaring back to life in many places, often in the nation’s hardest-hit industrial towns. Many advanced manufacturing jobs don’t require a four-year college degree, so you can start working and earning just a year or two after high school. But make no mistake: this is not low-skilled work.

Tags: Top 5

New Poll: Teachers Like Common Core Standards!

October 8, 2014

A frequent talking point for critics of the Common Core State Standards is that teachers don’t like the standards. Until very recently, the critics had some teacher polling data to back them up, but a new poll from Scholastic has turned the tables. By and large, teachers like the Common Core.

Tags: Common Core

Remembering Margaret Ashida

October 7, 2014

We are inexpressibly saddened by the untimely passing of Margaret Ashida. Margaret was the indefatigable director of STEMx, a group of state STEM networks that are working together to transform STEM education for our nation's youth.

Math pays, unless you're a teacher

October 1, 2014

If you study math in college, you can probably look forward to a nice salary--unless, of course, you become a math teacher. It is hardly a surprise, then, that math teachers are so hard to come by.

Tags: math, teachers

New Vital Signs data: Advanced Placement results for your state

August 11, 2014

Check out CTEq’s Vital Signs new data on student success in Advanced Placement tests of math and science. We provide the only available analysis of how many students in each state took and succeeded in AP tests—broken down by race and gender. To see what’s happening in your state, visit Vital Signs, select your state from the map, choose “Challenging Content” from the sidebar, and then scroll down to the bottom of the page.

Tags: Vital Signs, STEMworks

In Memory of Donna Sterling

June 25, 2014

This week, the STEM education world lost a leading educator whose work is improving science education across the country.  Dr. Donna Sterling, a professor at George Mason University in Virginia, passed away on Tuesday after a long illness.

Tags: STEMworks

Putting our Rhetoric to the Test

June 17, 2014

For decades, Americans have paid lip service to the need for schools to teach higher-order skills like problem solving and critical thinking. Common Core State Standards in math and English are the nation’s first major effort to turn that rhetoric into reality. We can’t afford to back pedal.

Common Core is bringing one critical fact into very high relief: students have to work much harder to learn higher-order skills than rote skills, and that requires a long-overdue cultural shift from schools, students and teachers alike.

Tags: Common Core

Code Red: Where Are the Women in Computing?

December 9, 2013

Here at CTEq, we're issuing a "code red."

As STEM educators, students, and enthusiasts across the country begin  celebrating Computer Science Education  Week, we've taken a step back to examine the big picture with our newest Vital Signs brief, Half Empty: As Men Surge Back Into Computing, Women are Left Behind, and the outlook is alarming:

Graph of degrees/certificates to women

Tags: Vital Signs, computer science, women & girls, infographic

New Math Scores: Are We Losing Steam?

November 7, 2013

Results from the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) came out today, and they tell a somewhat depressing story. The math scores of U.S. fourth and eighth graders rocketed upwards from at least 1990 until about 2005, when they began to level off. Why are our students losing steam? Perhaps the big reforms states launched more than 20 years ago have delivered all the results they can. The message here? It's time for another shock to the system.

Here's what the trend in 4th grade math scores looks like (and 8th grade is pretty similar):

Tags: math, standards, STEM & the states

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